“Fat” Faith

By Robin Crowell, MPAS, PA-C

Poverty… a name that immediately brings Africa to your mind. But why? What exactly does this word “poverty” mean?

“A deficiency of necessary or desirable ingredients, qualities, etc.”

Why do we always assume that refers to money? Yes, a component of a poverty-stricken land is lack of monetary means. By these standards, anyone would consider Zambia poor. From the outside looking in, you can see the statistics. Over 64% of the population lives below the “poverty line.” (Living on less than $1.90 per day, or just under 20 kwacha). For the new foreigner coming to Zambia, you can see “poverty” everywhere you walk, particularly in the rural areas. Considering the worldly view, Zambia is poor… Read More

Grace in the Face of Suffering

By Lauren Webber, RN The Faces of Suffering.  This would be the title of the Times magazine news spread if they had chosen to highlight the 100-day national physician strike in Kenya. Thousands upon thousands of innocent lives suffering needlessly at the hand of bureaucracy, injustice, and corruption. Both sides pointing fingers, but neither listening… Read More

Finding the Hope of Passover in a Refugee Crisis

By Allie Riddle, BSN, RN

I come home from work trying to forget what I have seen. The last, racking chest rise and fall of a malnourished child, who appears more like a skeleton than body. The tear-filled, red-rimmed eyes of a young boy watching the small corpse of a friend or sister being carried out of the mortuary. The tension and fear in a mother’s eyes as she carries her limp toddler into a poorly resourced health clinic. I want to forget what I have heard. The last breaths. The cries of pain. The sound of tears. Read More

The Place God Calls You To

Over the last few days, I’ve been quiet and reflective about life here in Egbe and happenings around the hospital. It is one thing to know basic statistics about a place and another thing to live them day to day. I know many medical facts especially related to mothers and babies. In any Nigerian town with 1,000 children being born annually, 124 of these children do not make it their fifth birthday. So, what is the reality of these numbers? Read More

Can God Use Me?

Julie and I had a close walk with the Lord before we were married. She was a career missionary from New Zealand working at an orphanage in Mozambique. Just before I started medical school, the Lord sent me on a short-term mission trip at that same orphanage. We have been married now for 15 years and God has given us five beautiful children and as many of you know, one of our children died at an early age. I went to East Africa with my pastor for two weeks and the Lord lit a fire in my heart for missions work in there. I called home to tell Julie and she said she had a peace about it, but she wanted the Lord to call the children also. At that time, the children were listening to the biography of Amy Carmichael and the Lord used it to inspire them to missions. Ultimately, the entire family was on board. Don’t get us wrong – we loved our lives in the U.S. The church, the Christian school. I loved my patients, I loved working at the hospital and I had a decent salary. Everything was good. Why leave? Read More

Strong Words

Living cross-culturally is a near constant school in the wonder of how others think, feel, and process differently. The lessons abound, the perspectives shape us, and the yet there is the sense (and truth) that we will always be “other.” One arena where we feel most alien is in collective vs. individual thought. We have so much to learn about how our people view community. To illustrate how extremely essential it is for them: in interviews done by others, the great majority of our people agreed with the statement that they would rather go to hell with their families than go to heaven without them. Read More

No Longer Slaves

There are not many times that I feel that you desire medical stories and testimonies of my days in medicine here at Kijabe. In fact, most of you who read our blog are not “medical” at all and I fear you would find these stories boring or confusing. But some stories need to be told, especially when there is nothing “medical” to explain what happened. Read More